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Native American Cultural Resources

NAGPRA: Preparing for and Writing Grant Proposals

Detailed Seminar Agenda

Seminar Overview

The National NAGPRA Program offers grants to assist museums and Indian tribes with the compliance process under the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). The NAGPRA process may include consultation and documentation regarding human remains and cultural items, and their repatriation or disposition. Learn how to assess the needs of a NAGPRA program, identify fundable projects, and write successful Consultation/Documentation and Repatriation grant proposals.

Faculty

Jan I. Bernstein, managing director, Bernstein & Associates NAGPRA Consultants, works with Indian tribes, Native Hawaiian organizations, museums, and federal agencies to provide training, grant writing, strategic plan development/implementation, consultation facilitation, repatriation claim development, and reburial assistance

and/or

Mary Anne Kenworthy, attorney, Department of Interior Solicitor’s Office; specializing in Indian law and focusing primarily on trust lands and cultural resource issues; provides training to tribes and law enforcement personnel on implementation and prosecution of violations under ARPA and NAGPRA

and/or

Megon Noble, NAGPRA project manager, University of California, Davis, coordinates NAGPRA compliance efforts for the campus; previously the Archaeology NAGPRA coordinator with the Burke Museum, University of Washington, and taught museums collections management

NAGPRA and ARPA: Applications and Requirements

Detailed Seminar Agenda

Seminar Overview

Review the historical context and intent of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) and the Archaeological Resources Protection Act (ARPA). Learn how these laws apply to the treatment, repatriation, and disposition of Native American cultural items and to the protection of archaeological resources on federal and tribal lands. Examine differences in legal definitions, when and how regulations apply, and permit requirements. Discuss practical applications and effective strategies for developing agreements prior to ground-disturbing actions.

Faculty

Claudia Nissley, president, Nissley Environmental Consultants; a nationally recognized expert in cultural heritage laws and practices; author, educator, and consultant; former executive manager with the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and governor-appointed Wyoming State Historic Preservation Officer

NAGPRA Essentials

Detailed Seminar Agenda

Seminar Overview

Review the compliance process for the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) for Indian tribes, Native Hawaiian organizations, federal agencies, and museums. Explore how consultation can inform inventories, summaries, and cultural affiliation, and the resulting notices, repatriations, and dispositions.

Faculty

Jan I. Bernstein, managing director, Bernstein & Associates NAGPRA Consultants, works with Indian tribes, Native Hawaiian organizations, museums, and federal agencies to provide training, grant writing, strategic plan development/implementation, consultation facilitation, repatriation claim development, and reburial assistance

and/or

Megon Noble, NAGPRA project manager, University of California, Davis, coordinates NAGPRA compliance efforts for the campus; previously the Archaeology NAGPRA coordinator with the Burke Museum, University of Washington, and taught museums collections management

or
 
Eric Hemenway, director of Repatriation, Archives and Records, Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, worked on numerous repatriation claims under various categories of NAGPRA; presenter and author of publications on NAGPRA; adjunct faculty, North Central Michigan College

Evaluation Comments

“The seminar covered a lot of information about all aspects of NAGPRA, which was helpful.”
 
“I now have a good understanding of NAGPRA.”
 
“It gave me a good overview of the complexities of NAGPRA issues that may come up.”

Native American Cultural Property Law

 

Detailed Seminar Agenda

Seminar Overview

Review the federal laws intended to preserve Native American heritage through the protection of cultural practices and sacred lands. Examine the use of statutes as tools to manage tangible and intangible cultural property. Discuss government-to-government obligations, court decisions, and case studies to illustrate federal policies and practice. Consider the legal, cultural, and historical perspectives resulting from decisions affecting Native American cultural property. Learn how the consultation process enables tribes, federal entities, and other parties to achieve resolution.

Faculty

Claudia Nissley, president, Nissley Environmental Consultants; a nationally recognized expert in cultural heritage laws and practices; author, educator, and consultant; former executive manager with the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and governor-appointed Wyoming State Historic Preservation Officer