slideshow 1

Cultural and Natural Resource Management

Emerging Technologies for Cultural Resources

Detailed Seminar Agenda

Seminar Overview

Review best means of integrating new technologies with existing CRM practices as they relate to the documentation, preservation, and/or creative mitigation of cultural resources. Learn about the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs or drones), digital documentation (photogrammetry), and virtual reality (new media methods). Discuss ways to integrate these technologies with more familiar forms of technology, such as geographic information systems (GIS), and explore how information gathered can be used for public outreach.

This seminar is offered in conjunction with GIS for Cultural Resources: An Introduction and GIS for Cultural Resources: Advanced Techniques.

Faculty

Luke J. Pecoraro, Ph.D., director of Archaeology, George Washington’s Mount Vernon; formerly staff archaeologist with the Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities Jamestown Rediscovery project; past experience teaching on the university level and in cultural resource management

GIS for Cultural Resources: Advanced Techniques

Detailed Seminar Agenda

Seminar Overview

Discuss how to use geographic information system (GIS) technology for applications that go beyond the basics for identification, evaluation, protection, and preservation of cultural resources. From geo referencing historic maps to publishing data online, looking at the latest data sources/types, and producing story maps, there are many innovative ways to use GIS technology to expand the resources available to professionals and the general public.

This seminar is offered in conjuction with Emerging Technologies for Cultural Resources and GIS for Cultural Resources: An Introduction.

Faculty

Deidre McCarthy, program manager, Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS), National Park Service; facilitates the use of GIS to manage the location, status, and condition of cultural resources

Evaluation Comments

“Absolutely valuable and applicable to my real-world project needs.”

“I am more aware of terminology and the process so I can better understand the GIS technicians.”

“Gave more sources for public data than I anticipated. Plus, many examples of tools and devices.”

“An overview of GIS capabilities was useful.” “Met my expectations for advance GIS tools with ARC GIS Explorer information.” “ I completely understand what georeferencing is and geodatabases.”

“Appreciated discussion of referencing historic maps and discussion on appropriate tools for surveying.” “The storyboards application will be very beneficial to my agency’s programs.”

“Useful to hear others and their issues and suggestions. The open discussion was by far the most useful.”

“The information is very helpful and I expect to use much of it in my position.”

Conflict Management and Negotiation Skills for Cultural and Natural Resource Managers

Detailed Seminar Agenda

Seminar Overview

Laws and regulations related to cultural and natural resources often require participatory processes that can be mired in conflict and misunderstanding. Projects frequently can be more effectively navigated when stakeholders use collaborative processes and mutual gains negotiation during consultation to resolve problems and develop win-win solutions. Through interactive exercises and role plays, learn to understand conflict management styles, practice negotiation skills, and design a stakeholder consultation process to address issues in a timely manner and prevent conflict from escalating.

Faculty

Tanya Denckla Cobb, director, University of Virginia Institute for Environmental Negotiation; facilitates and mediates community and environmental issues, including facility siting, land use planning, natural resource protection, and heritage preservation

Cultural and Natural Resources: An Integrated Management Strategy

Detailed Seminar Agenda

Seminar Overview

Explore a holistic stewardship approach to an integrated management strategy for cultural and natural resources on public and private lands. These resources often are analyzed and planned for independently, leading to isolated approaches. Through case studies, discuss and evaluate long-term planning and decisionmaking processes that combine legal and management frameworks to better conserve and preserve the core values of these resources.

Faculty

Claudia Nissley, president, Nissley Environmental Consultants; a nationally recognized expert in cultural heritage laws and practices; author, educator, and consultant; former executive manager with the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and governor-appointed Wyoming State Historic Preservation Officer

GIS for Cultural Resources: An Introduction

Detailed Seminar Agenda

Seminar Overview

Review introductory geographic information system (GIS) concepts and functionality, combining spatial technologies and database management systems in the area of historic preservation. Learn how to use GIS software through hands-on exercises for identification, evaluation, protection, and preservation of cultural resources. From assisting with inventories, to mapping historic districts and battlefields, to mitigating the impact of disasters on historic areas, GIS technology can be used to provide a better basis for planning and decisionmaking for the nation’s heritage.

This seminar is offered in conjunction with Emerging Technologies for Cultural Resources and GIS for Cultural Resources: Advanced Techniques.

Faculty

Deidre McCarthy, program manager, Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS), National Park Service; facilitates the use of GIS to manage the location, status, and condition of cultural resources

Landscape Preservation: An Introduction

Detailed Seminar Agenda

Seminar Overview

In this introduction to the basics of cultural landscapes, learn about designed, vernacular, and ethnographic landscapes, and historic sites. Review applicable laws and regulations, and discuss how to identify and inventory character-defining features of a landscape. Explore the concepts of preservation planning and documentation, and the development of the cultural landscape report for use in managing historic and cultural landscapes. Case studies illustrate realistic approaches to effective landscape management and preservation.

This seminar is offered in conjunction with Landscape Preservation: Advanced Tools for Managing Change.

Faculty

Lucinda A. Brockway, program director for cultural resources, The Trustees of Reservations; formerly principal and owner, Past Designs, a landscape preservation and design firm specializing in preservation and management of historic landscapes; author of two books and several articles on historic landscapes

or

Nancy J. Brown, ASLA, historical landscape architect, experience with National Park Service, Olmsted Center for Landscape Preservation, and University of Virginia; currently at the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation; specialist in cultural landscapes and Section 106

Landscape Preservation: Advanced Tools for Managing Change

Detailed Seminar Agenda

Seminar Overview

In this advanced landscape preservation seminar, explore the sometimes conflicting issues that direct the process of change and decisionmaking for challenging landscapes. Review the practice and discuss the implications of inventorying, evaluating, treating, and maintaining landscape resources. Identify tools and techniques for managing change when difficult issues affect the process. Understand the philosophical foundations for making sound, educated decisions about the preservation and long-term management of historic and cultural landscapes.

This seminar is offered in conjunction with Landscape Preservation: An Introduction.

Faculty

Lucinda A. Brockway, program director for cultural resources, The Trustees of Reservations; formerly principal and owner, Past Designs, a landscape preservation and design firm specializing in preservation and management of historic landscapes; author of two books and several articles on historic landscapes

or

Nancy J. Brown, ASLA, historical landscape architect, experience with National Park Service, Olmsted Center for Landscape Preservation, and University of Virginia; currently at the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation; specialist in cultural landscapes and Section 106

Renewable Energy Development: Impacts on Cultural Resources

Detailed Seminar Agenda

Seminar Overview

Identify the impacts and effects that large-scale renewable energy development, such as solar and wind power, geothermal projects, and corridor development may have on cultural resources. Understand the infrastructure systems required and review approaches for identifying resources. Discuss the legal and consultation requirements under Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act and the National Environmental Policy Act. Explore the time frames and options for addressing impacts on cultural and natural resources.

Faculty

Claudia Nissley, president, Nissley Environmental Consultants; a nationally recognized expert in cultural heritage laws and practices; author, educator, and consultant; former executive manager with the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and governor-appointed Wyoming State Historic Preservation Officer