slideshow 1

Identification, Planning, and Evaluation

Historic Bridges: Management, Regulations, and Rehabilitation

Detailed Seminar Agenda

Seminar Overview

Historic bridges represent a significant inventory of America's engineering heritage. Learn bridge typology and history. Discuss impacts on resources, avoidance of adverse effects, and alternatives and solutions. Explore how a collaborative team approach to rehabilitation projects benefits the regulatory and design process through interactive exercises. Discuss rehabilitation techniques that will meet engineering and historic standards. Review how to successfully navigate the requirements of the NEPA, Section 106, and Section 4(f) processes.

Faculty

Amy R. Squitieri, principal, Mead & Hunt; experience in transportation planning includes historic preservation and environmental compliance; nationally recognized for her work with historic bridges, past projects include statewide historic bridge inventories, preservation feasibility studies, alternatives analysis, and management and rehabilitation plans

OR

Kristen M. Zschomler, RPA, supervisor, Cultural Resources Unit, Minnesota Department of Transportation; a historian and archaeologist, she is the lead manager for MnDOT’s Historic Bridge Program and has overseen the development of more than 200 historic bridge management plans and 30 historic bridge rehabilitation projects

AND

Amber L. Blanchard, P.E., bridge planning and hydraulics engineer, Minnesota Department of Transportation, with experience in the design-build process of bridge design and as co-developer of the historic bridge process and training, rehabilitation study report format, and resource documents 

OR

Steve A. Olson, Ph.D., P.E., president and principal bridge engineer, Olson & Nesvold Engineers; experience in design, inspection and analysis with highway, railroad, and pedestrian bridges, including many listed on the National Register of Historic Places; he has collaborated on bridge management plans, rehabilitation studies, and projects

Evaluation Comments

“The seminar gave me valuable insight into the issues and process when working on historic bridges.”

“Clearly, succinctly covered an incredible amount of information on many aspects of historic bridges I need to know. I think this seminar went into as much detail as was reasonable, given the time, on material conservation, how materials erode/weather, and technical aspects of engineering.”

“The blending of engineers, historians, consultants provided for excellent variety of conversations, especially during the group exercises.”

“Very good examples of past projects [case studies] along with lessons learned, techniques, and things to watch for.”

“It met my expectations in the discussion of environmental requirements and the explanation and application of NEPA/Section 106/Section 4(f).”

“I found the collaboration exercises to be very beneficial because it gave the opportunity to put things into practice.”

“Going through the entire process was helpful. Group discussions were enlightening as well as a good way to have the group feel comfortable talking to each other.”

“The instructors’ experience with management plans and collaboration between engineers/historians/state/federal agencies provided great information on this topic.”

“Provided a methodology to move forward on historic bridge projects.”

Identification and Evaluation of Arts and Crafts, Ready-cut, and Prefabricated Houses

Detailed Seminar Agenda

Seminar Overview

Explore keys to understanding some of the most seminal and widespread late 19th-century and 20th-century housing styles and types. Discussion focuses on the history and development of Arts and Crafts, ready-cut, and prefabricated houses. Learn about building components, identify models based on design characteristics, review research sources, and evaluate significance for federal guidelines and the National Register of Historic Places. 

Each of these topics is available as a one-day customized training seminar or may be combined into a multiple-day workshop. Organizations may want to further customize by adding walking or driving tours that highlight a particular house type in a local historic district.

Arts and Crafts Houses. In a counter-reaction to the abundance of ornamentation associated with late 19th-century design, the Arts and Crafts movement (1890-1920), called for simplification in art and everyday life. Explore the origins of this English movement favoring the picturesque and artistic in domestic architecture, with an emphasis on fine craftsmanship, and compare with the more straightforward, practical designs that predominated in America. Discuss how the rising influence of publications emphasizing the home played a significant role in disseminating Arts and Crafts house design, interiors, and fixtures.

Ready-cut Houses. The ready-cut catalog or kit house made significant contributions to residential architecture in American cities and new suburbs (1906-1982). Explore the history of this house type and the companies that produced them, including industry leaders Sears and Aladdin. Learn to identify types, styles, and dates of their models from catalogue designs and built examples.

Prefabricated Houses. Peaking in popularity during the post-World War II housing shortage and subsequent boom, the prefabricated house (1940-1975) had industrial antecedents in the19th century and even earlier. Explore various types of prefabricated and modular construction. Review catalogue designs and built examples of housing models produced by manufacturers including National Homes and Gunnison/U.S. Steel.

Faculty

James C. Massey, Assoc. AIA, architectural historian and planner, former HABS chief, contributing editor to Old-House Journal, and historic preservation consultant with a particular interest in the mid-20th century

Preservation Planning for Campuses, Complexes, and Installations

Detailed Seminar Agenda

Seminar Overview

Understand how buildings and landscapes contribute to the institutional identity of campuses, complexes, and installations. Discuss how to integrate historic preservation  considerations into the master planning process when faced with development pressures and the need to expand boundaries and reconfigure facilities. By analyzing campus evolution and history and identifying significant elements, learn how to use critical thinking in developing a plan that meets client needs and preserves cultural resources.

Faculty

Edith Cherry, FAIA, ASLA, professor emerita of architecture, University of New Mexico; partner emerita, Cherry/See/Reames Architects, specializing in architectural programming and historic preservation for educational, commercial, institutional, and residential architecture projects

Karen Van Citters, CSI, CDT, principal, Van Citters Historic Preservation, and an architectural historian and historical architect specializing in preservation planning, the restoration of historic structures, and project management for interdisciplinary cultural resource projects

Preservation Planning and Policy Development for Historic Roads

Detailed Seminar Agenda

Seminar Overview

Explore the current tools and techniques used for the identification, preservation, and management of historic roads. As an emerging area of historic preservation, planning and policy for historic roads presents new challenges for the historic preservation professional. Learn how to apply transportation policies to historic roads, balance safety and function with historic preservation objectives, and build awareness and new constituencies for the legacy of highway design in the United States.

Faculty

Dan Marriott, Ph.D., principal and founder of Paul Daniel Marriott + Associates, a historic and scenic road preservation planning firm specializing in linear corridor studies, regional planning strategies and analysis; author of Saving Historic Roads: Design and Policy Guidelines

or

MaryAnn Naber, Federal Highway Administration liaison, Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and formerly with FHWA; specializing in Section 106, Section 4(f), NEPA, and tribal consultation; member of the Transportation Research Board Committee on Archeology and Historic Preservation

The Recent Past: Strategies for Evaluation

Detailed Seminar Agenda

Seminar Overview

Examine nationwide trends in mid-20th-century houses and neighborhoods, with an emphasis on the evaluation of large suburban developments, construction methods, and house types and plans. Review era-specific factors that help to identify and categorize these buildings. Evaluate survey methodologies and consider the impact of neighborhood zoning, subdivision design review, urban renewal, and owner associations. Discuss how to determine the significance and integrity of resources when evaluating eligibility for federal and state programs, such as the National Register and the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards.

Faculty

James C. Massey, Assoc. AIA, architectural historian and planner, former HABS chief, contributing editor to Old-House Journal, and historic preservation consultant with a particular interest in the mid-20th century

Traditional Cultural Places

Detailed Seminar Agenda

Seminar Overview

“Traditional cultural places” (TCPs) play an important role in community cultural traditions, beliefs, and activities. TCPs must be considered in planning under the National Environmental Policy Act, the National Historic Preservation Act, Executive Orders 12898 and 13007, and other authorities. Review methods of identifying TCPs, discuss evaluation for National Register eligibility, and explore management issues.

Faculty

Claudia Nissley, president, Nissley Environmental Consultants; a nationally recognized expert in cultural heritage laws and practices; author, educator, and consultant; former executive manager with the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and governor-appointed Wyoming State Historic Preservation Officer